Pink is the new yellow

It was Elle Macpherson who launched the trend to that woman wear a Daytona in gold, this is in gold but in her bell collection includes of course also one of rosé.

It was Elle Macpherson who launched the trend to that woman wear a Daytona in gold, this is in gold but in her bell collection includes of course also one of rosé.

Rose toned gold is hardly a new phenomenon. Already the ancient Chinese, Greeks and Romans used it. Since natural gold ore is not completely pure gold, and modern methods for purification had not been invented yet, the ore was usually melted together with other metals – often copper which gave the gold a pink touch. Antique gold is sometimes described as having a slightly reddish color. This comes from the addition of a bit of copper.

by Britta Rossander

According to the Chinese philosophical system Feng Shui, red gold has very positive energies and is said to bring prosperity to its wearer. That’s why it’s a must for every ambitious Chinese businessman to wear a watch or piece of jewelry in rose gold.

1

In the world of watches, rose gold until recently used to be limited to the costly collector’s items. In the late 1980’s and early 1990’s a pink gold double started showing up on what we today refer to as fashion watches. By the early 2000’s pink gold totally exploded throughout the watch industry.

3

A negative side to the material is that the freshness of the tone may in some cases fade away with time. This can be avoided by adding some platinum or palladium to the mix.

Rolex, world famous for their gold watches, sought the perfect rose gold with a lasting lustre and created their own alloy that they named Everose. It has a warm tone and consists of 18 carat gold with a few drops of platinum, the most precious and expensive of metals. This makes sure the pink lustre will last forever. Copper has the drawback of being sensitive to things like saltwater and chlorine, but a touch of platinum remedies the problem.

2

Everose was introduced by Rolex in 2005. Many of their watches are so-called “bicolore” (two-colored) and Everose is the perfect compliment to the shiny 904L stainless steel that Rolex buys from the Swedish producer Sandvik.